Works cited for the bluest eye

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While Claudia and Pecola both experience love and the pain it brings, the relationship between love and pain changes significantly within these experiences. She examines the interaction between pain and familial and sexual love in her novel The Bluest Eye leading the reader to realize the different ways that love and pain interact with each other, and that love, by nature, is inherently painful.

The pain caused by such intense love is appealing to Claudia, bittersweet and sublime.

The bluest eye vintage edition citation

Your time is important. New York: Random House, Claudia—along with the reader—realizes the wonderful complexity of love lies in its complicated relationship with pain. Claudia, because of the love she receives from her family, knows that love, at its most intense, can hurt profoundly. In this moment, Claudia realizes the power and promise of love—if nothing else, it will break the heart and cause one so much pain, the only relief will be a song. The procreation and pleasure of intercourse is lost in this scene, replaced with the dark terror and pain of looming suffocation and death. Review of The Bluest Eye. While the MacTeers protect and love their daughters fiercely, the Breedloves are not sure how to love their children, because they hate themselves. At its core, though, the novel is really a story about the extents and limits of love. Pecola is another young, black girl who — unlike Claudia — is obsessed with the thought that in order to be beautiful, she must be blond-haired and blue-eyed. The violence is a distortion of what, perhaps, we want to do. Both Claudia and Pecola experience familial and sexual love in starkly different ways, and both endure the pain that accompanies such love. Pecola is also the person who suffers most from the denial of possessing the white characteristics of beauty.

Westport, CT: Greenwood, New York: Plume Book, Pecola, on the other hand, experiences love in a far more sinister sense. While the MacTeers protect and love their daughters fiercely, the Breedloves are not sure how to love their children, because they hate themselves.

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A third message in the stories is that of perseverance and survival, according to Missy Kubitschek in her book Toni Morrison: A Critical Companion.

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Ethnic Studies and “The Bluest Eye”: [Essay Example], words GradesFixer